U.S. Supreme Court Gives Police the Green Light To Pre-emptively Shoot and Kill Drivers They Fear Could Pose a Danger to Others With Their Car

by Patriots Staff

The Supreme Court has let stand the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals’ ruling that granted qualified immunity to a Michigan police officer who shot and killed a man in a drive-thru lane at a White Castle after observing the driver make a series of traffic violations that nearly caused collisions. Although Antonino Gordon had not caused an accident or injured anyone while being observed or followed in his car by the police officer for almost 30 minutes, the Sixth Circuit concluded that police can use excessive force preemptively against a driver if they fear he might endanger others.

Cops who feel empowered to act as judge, jury and executioner are not making America any safer,” said constitutional attorney John W. Whitehead, president of The Rutherford Institute and author of Battlefield America: The War on the American People. “This is yet another chilling reminder that in the American police state, ‘we the people’ are at the mercy of police officers who have almost absolute discretion to decide who is a threat, what constitutes resistance, and how harshly they can deal with those they were appointed to protect.”

We are now entering a very dangerous era in American Law Enforcement. The police may kill you if they believe you pose a danger to other Drivers. WHAT? Killed for a Potential Thought crime?. So if the guy the cops just shot kills another innocent motorist by crashing into his or her car after being shot what has the decision prevented? This is depopulation ! If this isn’t a license for the cops to kill anyone for any reason, what could ever qualify?  This policy WILL BE ABUSED, you can bank on it! This is both unconstitutional and CRAZY !!  And this is a what a police state looks like

U.S. Supreme Court Gives Police the Green Light To Preemptively Shoot and Kill Drivers They Fear Could Pose a Danger to Others With Their Car


BREAKING: Trump sues Biden regime over 'unreasonable search and seizure' during Mar-a-Lago raid

by American News

The lawsuit comes as a Florida magistrate prepares to decide whether to unseal the affidavit that led to the raid on Trump's Mar-a-Lago residence.

BREAKING Trump sues Biden regime over unreasonable search and seizure during Mar-a-Lago raid

Former President Donald Trump is sueing the government and asking that a special master to determine what materials from the Mar-a-Lago raid can be used against him in the investigation.

Trump filed the lawsuit in the US District Court in the Southern District of Florida on Monday afternoon, claiming that his Fourth Amendment rights were violated by the raid and the subsequent seizure of certain documents, including two of his passports. The Fourth Amendment prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures.

The lawsuit comes as a Florida magistrate prepares to decide whether to unseal the affidavit that led to the raid on Trump's Mar-a-Lago residence.

"Politics cannot be allowed to impact the administration of justice. President Donald Trump is the clear frontrunner in the 2024 Republican Presidential Primary and in the 2024 General Election, should he decide to run", the lawsuit reads, according to the Daily Mail.

It states that the raid was "shockingly aggressive" and shows that "no understanding of the distress that it would cause most Americans."

"Like all citizens, (Trump) is protected by the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. Property seized in violation of his constitutional rights musty be returned forthwith."

The lawsuit switches between constitutional arguments over "rights to protection from unreasonable search and seizure to some of Trump's long-held grievances," Daily Mail reports.

"The Government has long treated President Donald J. Trump Unfairly," says one heading in the lawsuit, claiming that the DOJ and the FBI have treated the former president "differently than any other citizen."

"Two years of noisy 'Russian collusion' investigations led to a Special Counsel's finding of biased FBI agents and officials," the suit says.

Source:  https://thepostmillennial.com/breaking-trump-sues-biden-regime-over-unreasonable-search-and-seizure-during-mar-a-lago-raid




DuckDuckGo in hot water over hidden tracking agreement with Microsoft

By Sead Fadilpašić


Microsoft's trackers work, while others are being blocked

A padlock against a black computer screen
(Image credit: Pixabay)

DuckDuckGo may face a user backlash after security researchers discovered a hidden tracking agreement with Microsoft.

The privacy-focused company offers a search engine that claims not to track people’s searches, or behavior, and also doesn't build user profiles that can be used to display personalized advertising.

Search engine aside, DuckDuckGo also offers a mobile browser (opens in new tab) of the same name, but this has raised concerns, as although this promises to block hidden third-party trackers, some from a certain tech giant are allowed to continue operating.

Search syndication agreement

Namely, while Google’s and Facebook’s trackers are being blocked, those of Microsoft are allowed to continue running. Zach Edwards, the security researcher who first discovered the issue, later also found that trackers related to the bing.com and linkedin.com domains were also being allowed through the blocks. 

The news quickly drew in crowds of dissatisfied users, with DuckDuckGo founder and CEO Gabriel Weinberg, soon chiming in to confirm the authenticity of the findings. 

Apparently, DuckDuckGo has a search syndication agreement with the software giant from Redmond, with Weinberg adding that the restrictions are only found in the browser, and are not related to the search engine. 

What remains unknown is why the company who is known for its transparency decided to keep this agreement a secret for as long as it could.

In a statement sent to BleepingComputer (opens in new tab), Weinberg said that DuckDuckGo offers “above-and-beyond protection” other browsers don’t even think of doing, but that the company “never promised” full anonymity (opens in new tab) when browsing. 

"We have always been extremely careful to never promise anonymity when browsing, because that frankly isn’t possible given how quickly trackers change how they work to evade protections and the tools we currently offer," he added.

"When most other browsers on the market talk about tracking protection, they are usually referring to 3rd-party cookie protection and fingerprinting protection, and our browsers for iOS, Android, and our new Mac beta, impose these restrictions on third-party tracking scripts, including those from Microsoft. What we're talking about here is an above-and-beyond protection that most browsers don't even attempt to do — that is, blocking third-party tracking scripts before they load on 3rd party websites."

"Because we're doing this where we can, users are still getting significantly more privacy protection with DuckDuckGo than they would using other browsers.” 

Sead is a seasoned freelance journalist based in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. He writes about IT (cloud, IoT, 5G, VPN) and cybersecurity (ransomware, data breaches, laws and regulations). In his career, spanning more than a decade, he’s written for numerous media outlets, including Al Jazeera Balkans. He’s also held several modules on content writing for Represent Communications.

Source:  https://www.techradar.com/news/duckduckgo-in-hot-water-over-hidden-tracking-agreement-with-microsoft











U.S. CISA WARNING — Dominion voting machines used in 16 states have ‘substantial vulnerabilities’…

[The heavy hitters in the media are now operating in Damage control to spin the evidence against electronic voting machines.  The Halderman report, evidence from 'True the Vote', 'Project Veritas' and Lindell's efforts all appear in multiple lawsuits. Why would you seal a scientific report describing election machine malfunctions? You should suspect AP motives for putting out this spiin piece at this point.  For those of you who remain skeptical about election theft can read the Halderman report and inspect the recorded evidence of fraud at frankspeech.com. - ED]

The nation’s leading cybersecurity agency says electronic voting machines from a leading vendor used in at least 16 states have software vulnerabilities


By Kate Brumback Associated Press

ATLANTA -- Electronic voting machines from a leading vendor used in at least 16 states have software vulnerabilities that leave them susceptible to hacking if unaddressed, the nation’s leading cybersecurity agency says in an advisory sent to state election officials.

The U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency, or CISA, said there is no evidence the flaws in the Dominion Voting Systems’ equipment have been exploited to alter election results. The advisory is based on testing by a prominent computer scientist and expert witness in a long-running lawsuit that is unrelated to false allegations of a stolen election pushed by former President Donald Trump after his 2020 election loss.

U.S. CISA WARNING — Dominion voting machines used in 16 states have ‘substantial vulnerabilities’…

The advisory, obtained by The Associated Press in advance of its expected Friday release, details nine vulnerabilities and suggests protective measures to prevent or detect their exploitation. Amid a swirl of misinformation and disinformation about elections, CISA seems to be trying to walk a line between not alarming the public and stressing the need for election officials to take action.

CISA Executive Director Brandon Wales said in a statement that “states’ standard election security procedures would detect exploitation of these vulnerabilities and in many cases would prevent attempts entirely.” Yet the advisory seems to suggest states aren't doing enough. It urges prompt mitigation measures, including both continued and enhanced "defensive measures to reduce the risk of exploitation of these vulnerabilities.” Those measures need to be applied ahead of every election, the advisory says, and it's clear that's not happening in all of the states that use the machines.

University of Michigan computer scientist J. Alex Halderman, who wrote the report on which the advisory is based, has long argued that using digital technology to record votes is dangerous because computers are inherently vulnerable to hacking and thus require multiple safeguards that aren’t uniformly followed. He and many other election security experts have insisted that using hand-marked paper ballots is the most secure method of voting and the only option that allows for meaningful post-election audits.

“These vulnerabilities, for the most part, are not ones that could be easily exploited by someone who walks in off the street, but they are things that we should worry could be exploited by sophisticated attackers, such as hostile nation states, or by election insiders, and they would carry very serious consequences,” Halderman told the AP.

Concerns about possible meddling by election insiders were recently underscored with the indictment of Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters in Colorado, who has become a hero to election conspiracy theorists and is running to become her state's top election official. Data from the county’s voting machines appeared on election conspiracy websites last summer shortly after Peters appeared at a symposium about the election organized by MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell. She was also recently barred from overseeing this year's election in her county. [AP fails to mention that current secretary of state Jena Griswold herself is facing an election fraud lawsuit -ED]

One of the most serious vulnerabilities could allow malicious code to be spread from the election management system to machines throughout a jurisdiction, Halderman said. The vulnerability could be exploited by someone with physical access or by someone who is able to remotely infect other systems that are connected to the internet if election workers then use USB sticks to bring data from an infected system into the election management system.

Several other particularly worrisome vulnerabilities could allow an attacker to forge cards used in the machines by technicians, giving the attacker access to a machine that would allow the software to be changed, Halderman said.

“Attackers could then mark ballots inconsistently with voters’ intent, alter recorded votes or even identify voters’ secret ballots,” Halderman said.

Halderman is an expert witness for the plaintiffs in a lawsuit originally filed in 2017 that targeted the outdated voting machines Georgia used at the time. The state bought the Dominion system in 2019, but the plaintiffs contend that the new system is also insecure. A 25,000-word report detailing Halderman's findings was filed under seal in federal court in Atlanta last July.

U.S. District Judge Amy Totenberg, who’s overseeing the case, has expressed concern about releasing the report, worrying about the potential for hacking and the misuse of sensitive election system information. She agreed in February that the report could be shared with CISA, which promised to work with Halderman and Dominion to analyze potential vulnerabilities and then help jurisdictions that use the machines to test and apply any protections.

Halderman agrees that there’s no evidence the vulnerabilities were exploited in the 2020 election. But that wasn’t his mission, he said. He was looking for ways Dominion's Democracy Suite ImageCast X voting system could be compromised. The touchscreen voting machines can be configured as ballot-marking devices that produce a paper ballot or record votes electronically.

In a statement, Dominion defended the machines as “accurate and secure.”

Dominion’s systems have been unjustifiably maligned by people pushing the false narrative that the 2020 election was stolen from Trump. Incorrect and sometimes outrageous claims by high-profile Trump allies prompted the company to file defamation lawsuits. State and federal officials have repeatedly said there’s no evidence of widespread fraud in the 2020 election — and no evidence that Dominion equipment was manipulated to alter results .[NONE of these questions have been subjected to a court authorized inspection of the voting machines except Antrim, County, Michigan where susbstantial fraud WAS uncovered. -ED]

Halderman said it’s an “unfortunate coincidence” that the first vulnerabilities in polling place equipment reported to CISA affect Dominion machines.

“There are systemic problems with the way election equipment is developed, tested and certified, and I think it’s more likely than not that serious problems would be found in equipment from other vendors if they were subjected to the same kind of testing,” Halderman said.

In Georgia, the machines print a paper ballot that includes a barcode — known as a QR code — and a human-readable summary list reflecting the voter's selections, and the votes are tallied by a scanner that reads the barcode.

“When barcodes are used to tabulate votes, they may be subject to attacks exploiting the listed vulnerabilities such that the barcode is inconsistent with the human-readable portion of the paper ballot,” the advisory says. To reduce this risk, the advisory recommends, the machines should be configured, where possible, to produce “traditional, full-face ballots, rather than summary ballots with QR codes.”

The affected machines are used by at least some voters in at least 16 states, and in most of those places they are used only for people who can't physically fill out a paper ballot by hand, according to a voting equipment tracker maintained by watchdog Verified Voting. But in some places, including all of Georgia, almost all in-person voting is on the affected machines.

Georgia Deputy Secretary of State Gabriel Sterling said the CISA advisory and a separate report commissioned by Dominion recognize that “existing procedural safeguards make it extremely unlikely” that a bad actor could exploit the vulnerabilities identified by Halderman. He called Halderman’s claims “exaggerated."

Dominion has told CISA that the vulnerabilities have been addressed in subsequent software versions, and the advisory says election officials should contact the company to determine which updates are needed. Halderman tested machines used in Georgia, and he said it’s not clear whether machines running other versions of the software share the same vulnerabilities.

Halderman said that as far as he knows, “no one but Dominion has had the opportunity to test their asserted fixes."

To prevent or detect the exploitation of these vulnerabilities, the advisory's recommendations include ensuring voting machines are secure and protected at all times; conducting rigorous pre- and post-election testing on the machines as well as post-election audits; and encouraging voters to verify the human-readable portion on printed ballots.

SOURCE:  https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/cyber-agency-voting-software-vulnerable-states-85092265