Mesa County report finds ‘illegal manipulation of tabulated vote data’ in 2020 and 2021

by WorldTribune Staff


A new report out of Mesa County, Colorado details illegal electronic “manipulation” of voting data in both the 2020 presidential election and the 2021 off-year election.

The report documents the findings of an examination of tabulated vote databases based on forensic analysis of the drive image of Mesa County’s Dominion Voting Systems (DVS) Election Management System server (EMS).

According to the report, “the findings provide evidence of unauthorized and illegal manipulation of tabulated vote data during the 2020 General Election and 2021 Grand Junction Municipal Election. Because of this evidence, which led to the vote totals for those elections being impossible to verify, the results and integrity of Mesa County’s 2020 General Election and the 2021 Grand Junction Municipal Election are in question.”

Trump spokeswoman Liz Harrington noted that “25,913 ballots cannot be validated,” for the 2020 election and “unauthorized election databases were created contrary to law.”

Harrington added that the report states that 10 batches of ballots were recorded as being scanned in 47 seconds, “which is physically impossible.”

The “same manipulation was discovered in the 2021 Grand Junction Municipal Election, affecting 8,540 ballots that cannot be validated,” Harrington noted.

Among the report’s findings:

• There was an unauthorized creation of new election databases during early voting in the 2020 General Election on October 21, 2020, followed by the digital reloading of 20,346 ballot records into the new election databases, making the original voter intent recorded from the ballots unknown. In addition, 5,567 ballots in 58 batches did not have their digital records copied to the new database, although the votes from the ballots in those batches were recorded in the Main election database.

• The same unauthorized creation of new election databases occurred during the 2021 Grand Junction Municipal Election on March 30, 2021, followed by the digital reloading of 2,974 ballot records, making the original voter intent recorded on those ballots unknown. In addition, 4,458 ballots in 46 batches did not have their digital records copied to the new database, although the votes from the ballots in those batches were recorded in the Main election database.

• The absence of secure hash algorithm (.sha) files for each digital ballot image makes the authenticity of each digital ballot image, and the ballot-level record for those ballots, impossible to verify.

• The true total vote count in Mesa County, Colorado cannot be accurately calculated for the 2020 General Election or the 2021 Grand Junction Municipal Election from records in the databases of the county’s voting system.

•There is no function or feature on the EMS server that could be executed inadvertently or deliberately by a local election official that
would cause this combination of events to occur, especially within the time frame that these events occurred. Given the complex sequence of data manipulations and deletions necessary to produce the digital evidence described in this report, this combination of events could not have been the result of either deliberate or inadvertent actions by those officials.

• Dominion’s installation of the Trusted Build update on the EMS in May of 2021, as ordered by the Colorado Secretary of State, destroyed all data on the EMS hard drive, including the batch and ballot records that evidenced the creation of new databases and reprocessing of ballot records described in Findings 1 and 2 above. This destruction of all data by the trusted build is described in the “Mesa County, Colorado Voting Systems Forensic Examination and Analysis Report”.

• The fact that such ballot record manipulation has been shown demonstrates a critical security failure with the DVS EMS wherever it is used. The manipulation would not be identifiable to an election official using the voting systems, nor to an observer or judge overseeing the election conduct, much less to citizens with no access to the voting systems; without both cyber and database management system expertise, and unfettered access to database records and computer log files (many of which were destroyed by the actions of the Secretary of State) from the EMS server, the manipulation would be undetectable.


BREAKING HUGE: New Mexico County Votes to Remove Dominion Voting Systems, Zuckerberg Drop Boxes, and Other Election Machines!

This is progress. Real progress. One only has to look to France — paper ballots only, no mail in voting (and mass fraud), no manipulable voting machines and they get the results in a couple of hours America takes ….. weeks and months. Scam.


Breaking Huge:

Otero County New Mexico Votes to Remove Dominion Voting Systems, Zuckerberg Drop Boxes, and Other Election Machines!

By Joe Hoft, The Gateway Pundit, June 9, 2022:

The Otero County Commission had a long day of discussions and reports today and then they landed upon the issues with the 2020 Election.  They voted to eliminate voting machines in the county.

After a day of discussions, the Otero Commission voted on the three following items.

The commission voted to pass all three of the above motions.

These commissioners were fearless. The more flack they got the more they knew they were over the target. They wanted every legal vote to count.

Here is the full day’s presentation – this discussion occurred at the end of the day.

Clinton Body Count: Suicide of Clinton advisor starts to look fishy…

by  Ben Ashford and Daniel Bates For Dailymail.com


EXCLUSIVE: Family of Bill Clinton advisor who admitted Jeffrey Epstein into White House seven times has blocked release of files detailing the death scene after he was found hanging from a tree with a shotgun blast at a ranch 30 miles from his home

  • Top Clinton advisor Mark Middleton died by suicide at the age of 59 on May 7, the Perry County Sheriff's Office in Arkansas confirmed 
  • Middleton was President Bill Clinton's special advisor who admitted Jeffrey Epstein to the White House seven of the at least 17 times the pedophile visited
  • The married father-of-two, who lived in Little Rock, Arkansas, shot himself at the Heifer Ranch in Perryville, 30 miles away from his home
  • DailyMail.com can now reveal Middleton's father Larry and his widow Rhea are fighting to keep photos and 'other illustrative content' of his death sealed 
  • The two filed for an injunction arguing that blocking the release of the footage would halt a proliferation of 'unsubstantiated conspiracy theories'
  • The lawsuit claims the family 'has been harassed by outlandish, hurtful, unsupported and offensive online articles' regarding Middleton and his death  
  • Perry County Sheriff Scott Montgomery said Middleton was discovered hanging from a tree with a shotgun blast to his chest
  • After the petition was filed, Montgomery denied DailyMail.com's FOIA request for any of his paperwork on the case


The family of a top advisor to Bill Clinton who admitted Jeffrey Epstein to the White House multiple times during his presidency is pulling out all the stops to keep details of his mysterious death becoming public.

They have petitioned a judge to prevent pictures of Mark Middleton's death scene being released under the Freedom of Information Act.

And now the local Arkansas sheriff is interpreting that to mean he can't talk or release any details of Middleton's May 7 suicide.

'The investigation is still open. I can't say anything more,' Perry County Sheriff Scott Montgomery told DailyMail.com. 

Middleton, who served as special assistant to President Bill Clinton in the 1990s, died at the age of 59, his family announced last month. 

His death adds to the number of close associates of the former president and first lady who have died unexpectedly, many in small plane crashes. The phenomenon has led to a conspiracy theory called Clinton Body Count which even has its own Wikipedia page.

Middleton's family did not disclose the cause of death at the time but authorities later confirmed the former White House official took his own life with a self-inflicted gunshot at an urban farm in Perryville, Arkansas.

In a lawsuit filed on May 23, the family admits Middleton committed suicide, and says they have 'a privacy interest' in preventing any 'photographs, videos, sketches (or) other illustrative content' from the death scene being released.

U.S. CISA WARNING — Dominion voting machines used in 16 states have ‘substantial vulnerabilities’…

[The heavy hitters in the media are now operating in Damage control to spin the evidence against electronic voting machines.  The Halderman report, evidence from 'True the Vote', 'Project Veritas' and Lindell's efforts all appear in multiple lawsuits. Why would you seal a scientific report describing election machine malfunctions? You should suspect AP motives for putting out this spiin piece at this point.  For those of you who remain skeptical about election theft can read the Halderman report and inspect the recorded evidence of fraud at frankspeech.com. - ED]

The nation’s leading cybersecurity agency says electronic voting machines from a leading vendor used in at least 16 states have software vulnerabilities


By Kate Brumback Associated Press

ATLANTA -- Electronic voting machines from a leading vendor used in at least 16 states have software vulnerabilities that leave them susceptible to hacking if unaddressed, the nation’s leading cybersecurity agency says in an advisory sent to state election officials.

The U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency, or CISA, said there is no evidence the flaws in the Dominion Voting Systems’ equipment have been exploited to alter election results. The advisory is based on testing by a prominent computer scientist and expert witness in a long-running lawsuit that is unrelated to false allegations of a stolen election pushed by former President Donald Trump after his 2020 election loss.

U.S. CISA WARNING — Dominion voting machines used in 16 states have ‘substantial vulnerabilities’…

The advisory, obtained by The Associated Press in advance of its expected Friday release, details nine vulnerabilities and suggests protective measures to prevent or detect their exploitation. Amid a swirl of misinformation and disinformation about elections, CISA seems to be trying to walk a line between not alarming the public and stressing the need for election officials to take action.

CISA Executive Director Brandon Wales said in a statement that “states’ standard election security procedures would detect exploitation of these vulnerabilities and in many cases would prevent attempts entirely.” Yet the advisory seems to suggest states aren't doing enough. It urges prompt mitigation measures, including both continued and enhanced "defensive measures to reduce the risk of exploitation of these vulnerabilities.” Those measures need to be applied ahead of every election, the advisory says, and it's clear that's not happening in all of the states that use the machines.

University of Michigan computer scientist J. Alex Halderman, who wrote the report on which the advisory is based, has long argued that using digital technology to record votes is dangerous because computers are inherently vulnerable to hacking and thus require multiple safeguards that aren’t uniformly followed. He and many other election security experts have insisted that using hand-marked paper ballots is the most secure method of voting and the only option that allows for meaningful post-election audits.

“These vulnerabilities, for the most part, are not ones that could be easily exploited by someone who walks in off the street, but they are things that we should worry could be exploited by sophisticated attackers, such as hostile nation states, or by election insiders, and they would carry very serious consequences,” Halderman told the AP.

Concerns about possible meddling by election insiders were recently underscored with the indictment of Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters in Colorado, who has become a hero to election conspiracy theorists and is running to become her state's top election official. Data from the county’s voting machines appeared on election conspiracy websites last summer shortly after Peters appeared at a symposium about the election organized by MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell. She was also recently barred from overseeing this year's election in her county. [AP fails to mention that current secretary of state Jena Griswold herself is facing an election fraud lawsuit -ED]

One of the most serious vulnerabilities could allow malicious code to be spread from the election management system to machines throughout a jurisdiction, Halderman said. The vulnerability could be exploited by someone with physical access or by someone who is able to remotely infect other systems that are connected to the internet if election workers then use USB sticks to bring data from an infected system into the election management system.

Several other particularly worrisome vulnerabilities could allow an attacker to forge cards used in the machines by technicians, giving the attacker access to a machine that would allow the software to be changed, Halderman said.

“Attackers could then mark ballots inconsistently with voters’ intent, alter recorded votes or even identify voters’ secret ballots,” Halderman said.

Halderman is an expert witness for the plaintiffs in a lawsuit originally filed in 2017 that targeted the outdated voting machines Georgia used at the time. The state bought the Dominion system in 2019, but the plaintiffs contend that the new system is also insecure. A 25,000-word report detailing Halderman's findings was filed under seal in federal court in Atlanta last July.

U.S. District Judge Amy Totenberg, who’s overseeing the case, has expressed concern about releasing the report, worrying about the potential for hacking and the misuse of sensitive election system information. She agreed in February that the report could be shared with CISA, which promised to work with Halderman and Dominion to analyze potential vulnerabilities and then help jurisdictions that use the machines to test and apply any protections.

Halderman agrees that there’s no evidence the vulnerabilities were exploited in the 2020 election. But that wasn’t his mission, he said. He was looking for ways Dominion's Democracy Suite ImageCast X voting system could be compromised. The touchscreen voting machines can be configured as ballot-marking devices that produce a paper ballot or record votes electronically.

In a statement, Dominion defended the machines as “accurate and secure.”

Dominion’s systems have been unjustifiably maligned by people pushing the false narrative that the 2020 election was stolen from Trump. Incorrect and sometimes outrageous claims by high-profile Trump allies prompted the company to file defamation lawsuits. State and federal officials have repeatedly said there’s no evidence of widespread fraud in the 2020 election — and no evidence that Dominion equipment was manipulated to alter results .[NONE of these questions have been subjected to a court authorized inspection of the voting machines except Antrim, County, Michigan where susbstantial fraud WAS uncovered. -ED]

Halderman said it’s an “unfortunate coincidence” that the first vulnerabilities in polling place equipment reported to CISA affect Dominion machines.

“There are systemic problems with the way election equipment is developed, tested and certified, and I think it’s more likely than not that serious problems would be found in equipment from other vendors if they were subjected to the same kind of testing,” Halderman said.

In Georgia, the machines print a paper ballot that includes a barcode — known as a QR code — and a human-readable summary list reflecting the voter's selections, and the votes are tallied by a scanner that reads the barcode.

“When barcodes are used to tabulate votes, they may be subject to attacks exploiting the listed vulnerabilities such that the barcode is inconsistent with the human-readable portion of the paper ballot,” the advisory says. To reduce this risk, the advisory recommends, the machines should be configured, where possible, to produce “traditional, full-face ballots, rather than summary ballots with QR codes.”

The affected machines are used by at least some voters in at least 16 states, and in most of those places they are used only for people who can't physically fill out a paper ballot by hand, according to a voting equipment tracker maintained by watchdog Verified Voting. But in some places, including all of Georgia, almost all in-person voting is on the affected machines.

Georgia Deputy Secretary of State Gabriel Sterling said the CISA advisory and a separate report commissioned by Dominion recognize that “existing procedural safeguards make it extremely unlikely” that a bad actor could exploit the vulnerabilities identified by Halderman. He called Halderman’s claims “exaggerated."

Dominion has told CISA that the vulnerabilities have been addressed in subsequent software versions, and the advisory says election officials should contact the company to determine which updates are needed. Halderman tested machines used in Georgia, and he said it’s not clear whether machines running other versions of the software share the same vulnerabilities.

Halderman said that as far as he knows, “no one but Dominion has had the opportunity to test their asserted fixes."

To prevent or detect the exploitation of these vulnerabilities, the advisory's recommendations include ensuring voting machines are secure and protected at all times; conducting rigorous pre- and post-election testing on the machines as well as post-election audits; and encouraging voters to verify the human-readable portion on printed ballots.

SOURCE:  https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/cyber-agency-voting-software-vulnerable-states-85092265